Chalazion: A Chalazion is an obstruction of the Meibomian Gland/s of the lid. It is not an infection, although some times a blepharitis can aggravate a chalazion. The Meibomian glands secrete the fatty layer of the tear film (The three layers of the tear film are fatty, mucinous, and aqueous).

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A Chalazion is an obstruction of the Meibomian Gland/s of the lid. It is not an infection, although some times a blepharitis can aggravate a chalazion. The Meibomian glands secrete the fatty layer of the tear film (The three layers of the tear film are fatty, mucinous, and aqueous).

The fatty material can solidify when it starts to be ejected from the opening at the edge of the lid. If this happens it can stop up the secretion of the gland, and the above results occur. This can be very painful. It is more common in children going through puberty. When it happens to adults, I usually tell them that they are probably going through their second childhood.

Sometimes, the pressure on the eye can cause and astigmatism which blurs vision and changes the glasses prescription temporarily until the bump goes away completely.

The treatment consists of applying hot compresses as hot as one can stand without burning themselves. These are applied for ten minutes at a time, and as often as possible. What happens is that the swelling in the backed up Meibomian gland will usually rupture to the inside of the lid. A sudden onset of mucoid white or whitish-yellow debris is noted in the tear film, many times making the vision blurred for a short period. Generally, there is a little knot of swelling noted where the previous large swelling was noted.  This will go away without treatment in about six months.

These should be observed by an ophthalmologist, especially if they do not readily go away.

For a printout Explaining Chalazion click this line.