Cystoid Macular Edema (CME)

Cystoid macular edema (CME) (edema means swelling)  is a relatively uncommon disorder which can affect vision. The macula is located directly in the back of the retina where the cornea and lens exquisitely focus the light, and is where we do our fine reading or watch repairing vision. The macula is where the cone cells are located. The cone cells of the retina allow us to see colors as well as fine vision.

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Cystoid Macular Edema (CME)

 

Cystoid macular edema (CME) (edema means swelling)  is a relatively uncommon disorder which can affect vision. The macula is located directly in the back of the retina where the cornea and lens exquisitely focus the light, and is where we do our fine reading or watch repairing vision. The macula is where the cone cells are located. The cone cells of the retina allow us to see colors as well as fine vision.

 

A number of things can cause a cystoid macular edema. Things such as any surgery which enters the eye, posterior vitreous separation, pregnancy as well as many others can cause CME. We have seen it, as well, with high doses of niacin used to manage high serum cholesterol.

 

 

                                                                      Fluorescein Angiography

A nontoxic dye is injected into the system. It is allowed to flow through the system and into the eye. A special camera is used to photograph the dye as it passes through the eye. We can see the dye as it passes through the arteries, into the capillaries, and back out on the venous side.

 

 

 

       This photograph demonstrates

        a leakage of dye

        during a fluroescein angiogram

 

 

 

 

 

  Petaloid Cystoid Macular Edema

 

 

 

 

The diagnosis of this condition is done by a technique called Fluorescein Angiography shown above right with no leakage. In this test, a yellow colored dye is injected into a vein of the arm. The dye is allowed to pass through the circulatory system into the eye where it is sequentially photographed.

 

The treatment usually consists of eye drops using a steroid and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication. Additionally, in rare cases, hyper baric oxygen has been helpful.

 

There is a subset of this condition relating to diabetes called diabetic macular edema. Many times, in the diabetic variety, it can be treated with laser.